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Thoughts on things I have no idea about.

Two justices say high court will likely rule on NSA programs ›

priceofliberty:

Two members of the Supreme Court indicated on Thursday night that the court will ultimately have to decide the legality of National Security Agency surveillance activities.

The two justices, Antonin Scalia and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, made the comments during a public event at the National Press Club in Washington. They were responding to questions posed by journalist Marvin Kalb about whether the court would take up cases arising from the recent disclosures about NSA surveillance, most notably by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

The justices did not discuss specific NSA programs. There are various lawsuits pending around the country challenging the government’s widespread collection of telephone records. A federal judge in Washington, D.C., ruled in December that the program was probably unlawful, while a judge in New York held later that month that it was not. Both cases are now on appeal.

Scalia, a leading conservative justice, said the court was not the best body to decide major national security issues because of its lack of expertise. But he indicated that the court would likely decide the issue of whether widespread gathering of telecommunications data violates the Fourth Amendment, which bars unlawful searches and seizures.

"The institution that will decide that is the institution least qualified to decide it," Scalia said. The legal question is about "balancing the emergency against the intrusion" on the individual, he said.

Nine justices serve on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Ginsburg, one of the court’s liberal members, said the justices would have little choice but to decide the matter should it come before them.

"We can’t run away and say, ‘Well, we don’t know much about that subject so we won’t decide it,’" she said.

If they use this rationale as an excuse to make a shitty ruling I swear

theatlantic:

General Mills: If You Clip This Coupon, You Can’t Sue Us

General Mills, the food mega-corporation that owns Betty Crocker, Nature Valley, and basically every sweet cereal you ate and served your kids, has a startling new legal policy making it illegal to sue the company after you:

- download or print a coupon;

- “join” an online communities (which online communities is in question, but possibly including Facebook);

- subscribe to an email newsletter;

- or redeem a promotion or participate in any “offering.”

In other words: It just became nearly impossible to get a deal on a General Mills product without forfeiting your rights to sue the company. Even if your kid with a peanut allergy eats a Fiber One bar with trace amounts of peanuts and gets sick. For this reason, the Times reports that the new terms could come under strict legal scrutiny.

This policy, known as “forced arbitration,” is becoming common among companies seeking ways to prevent users and customers from joining together and suing for millions of dollars for things like false advertising.

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

(via deadwicked)

thesimplelifeofapetey:

image

(via ontologicalshakedown)

maxlibertarios:

insurgentbeat:

vicemag:

The Police Raided My Friend’s House Over a Parody Twitter Account 

Jon Daniel woke up on Thursday morning to a news crew in his living room, which was a welcome change from the company he had on Tuesday night, when the Peoria, Illinois, police came crashing through the door. The officers tore the 28-year-old’s home apart, seizing electronics and taking several of his roommates in for questioning; one woman who lived there spent three hours in an interrogation room. All for a parody Twitter account.

Yes, the cops raided Daniel’s home because they wanted to find out who was behind @peoriamayor, an account that had been shut down weeks ago by Twitter. When it was active, Daniel used it to portray Jim Ardis, the mayor of Peoria, as a weed-smoking, stripper-loving, Midwestern answer to Rob Ford. The account never had more than 50 followers, and Twitter had killed it because it wasn’t clearly marked as a parody. It was a joke, a lark—but it brought the police to Daniel’s door. The cops even took Daniel and one of his housemates in for in-depth questioning—they showed up at their jobs, cuffed them, and confiscated their phones—because of a bunch of Twitter jokes.

Now Daniel’s panicking.

“I’m going to fucking jail,” he told me yesterday when he was on a break from his job as a line cook. “They’re going to haul me away for this shit.”

Continue

Thought criminal apprehended.
No one is allowed to mock State leaders.
Those that do shall be muzzled.

This is scary as fuck

(via priceofliberty)

(via lumlination)

hermionejg:

Los seres humanos no nacen para siempre el día en que sus madres los alumbran, sino que la vida los obliga a parirse a sí mismos una y otra vez.

- Gabriel García Márquez (March 6, 1927-April 17th, 2014)

[human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves]


(via lumlination)

I felt a tremendous distance between myself and everything real.

Hunter S. Thompson  (via westorientaletters)

(via lumlination)

juvenilecinephile:

hoodfuturism:

Akira (1988) vs Stronger - Kanye West (2007)

TRULY

IT IS HIS FAVORITE ANIME MOVIE OF ALL-TIME!!!!!

(via iran-ed)

(via nocountryforx-men)

(via adamgozaimus)