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Thoughts on things I have no idea about.

(via epistemologicalfallacy)

anarcho-queer:

Police Officers Who Shot at Two Innocent Women 103 Times Won’t Be Fired or Suspended

The eight Los Angeles police officers who shot at two women over 100 times will not lose their jobs. They won’t even be suspended. They’ll just get some additional training.

They’ll need it, since the shooting happened at the height of the manhunt for cop-killer Christopher Dorner, when police mistook two women delivering newspapers in a blue Toyota Tacoma pickup truck for one man hellbent on revenge in a charcoal Nissan Titan pickup truck and shot at them 103 times. One of the women, who was 71 at the time, was hit twice in the back. The second woman was hit by broken glass. I would say those cops should get some training in target practice, but then it’s probably best for innocent newspaper carriers that they don’t.

A commission found that the officers violated department policy when they thought the sound of a newspaper hitting the pavement was a gunshot and opened fire on two women who were, again, doing absolutely nothing wrong except driving a truck that didn’t even look like the one they believed their suspect to be in.

The officers faced suspension or even firing, but police chief Charlie Beck elected instead to let them all return to duty once they undergo some additional training, according to a memo obtained by the AP. The officers have not been named, so you’ll probably never know if the guy writing your speeding ticket once shot at an innocent senior citizen. 

Shortly after the women were mistaken for Dorner, another police officer shot at another pickup truck. This one was black Honda Ridgeline. Brian McGee drove his cruiser into the truck and opened fire three times. The man inside the truck was not hit, but he sustained back and head injuries. The city of Torrance, where the incident took place, gave him $20,000 to replace his truck which was, again, a black Honda Ridgeline and not a gray Nissan Titan.

In January, prosecutors found that the officer was “justified in using force to stop the vehicle and in discharging his firearm and declined to press charges.

(via priceofliberty)

chilbudius:

memackle mori

(via altarandhour)

boxlunches:

The Iron Throne as described in the novels, officially endorsed by GRRM on his blog as the most accurate artistic representation thus far. By artist Marc Simonetti.

Oh

(via altarandhour)

trendingly:

What Cities Would Look Like Without Lights

Click Here To See More!

(via letsgroove)

hipsterlibertarian:

thefreelioness:

thelandofmaps:

U.S. Imprisonment Rate Per 100,000 Residents, 1978-2012

The US incarcerates more people per capita than any other nation in the world: Approximately 1 in 100 adults or more than 2.2 million people are behind bars in the US, according to the Pew Center on the States. In addition, another 4.6 million (or a total of almost 7 million) people live under some form of correctional supervision. 

Mass incarceration is not a result of higher crime rates: The US has the highest incarceration rate in the world not because it has higher crime rates, but because it imprisons more types of criminal offenders, including non-violent and drug offenders, and keeps them in prison longer. With the exception of homicide, US crime rates are comparable to other European countries with much lower incarceration rates. 

Mass incarceration disproportionately impacts US racial minorities: Mass incarceration has had a devastating effect on blacks and Hispanics in the US. African Americans are six times more likely to be incarcerated than a white person and non-white Latinos are almost three times more likely to be incarcerated, according to the Pew Center on the States. 

Incarceration hits hardest at young black and Latino men without high school education. An astounding 11 percent of black men, aged between 20 and 34, are behind bars. Much of the racial disparity is a result of the US’ war on drugs - started by President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. By 1988, blacks were arrested on drug charges at five times the rate of whites. By 1996, the rate of drug admissions to state prison for black men was 13 times greater than the rate for white men. This is despite the fact that African Americans use drugs at roughly the same rate as white Americans. 

Mass incarceration is expensive: Imprisoning people is not cheap. The average cost of housing an inmate is approximately $20,000 to $30,000 per year. This price tag comes at the direct expense of public money that could be spent on public education, medical care and public assistance. And it is one reason why so many states face fiscal crises today. 

Source

It’s nice to see that my current state (Minnesota) is one of the best on this issue, but the map as a whole is devastating. 

(via luftmensche)

(via priceofliberty)

(via altarandhour)

Over the last year, thanks in large part to illegal leaks, we’ve learned that we’re living in a [REDACTED] republic. In the president’s version of ‘transparency,’ the Americans have no right to debate even the most basic public questions — like the legal standards for spying on or killing American citizens — unless, of course, that information leaks, at which point the administration ‘welcomes’ the debate.